High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photos

High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photos

We often shoot our photos in High Dynamic Range (HDR), which preserves the detail in darker or brighter areas that would otherwise be lost in a normal exposure. HDR photos represent the wider range of detail in a scene that is visible to the human eye but generally lost through the limitations of the camera lens.

High Dynamic Range (HDR) - Nelsonville Public Square - Normal Exposure

Image 1. Nelsonville Public Square (Normal Exposure)

High Dynamic Range (HDR) - Nelsonville Public Square - Underexposed

Image 2. Nelsonville Public Square (Underexposed)

High Dynamic Range (HDR) - Nelsonville Public Square - Overexposed

Image 3. Nelsonville Public Square (Overexposed)

High Dynamic Range (HDR) - Nelsonville Public Square - HDR Image

Image 4. Nelsonville Public Square (HDR Image)

Our HDR photographs are achieved by blending and processing three different standard photographs:

  • Normal exposure. The first photograph is taken at a normal exposure. If this photograph were processed alone, some detail that would normally be visible to the human eye, when looking at the scene, would be lost through the camera lens because it is less sensitive. In particular, the visibile details are lost in the brightest and darkest areas of the scene.
  • See Image 1 to the right as an example of a normal exposure image taken at sunrise in the historic Public Square in Nelsonville, Ohio. You will notice that the normal exposure does not show some of the detail in the sky (the brightest region of the photograph) or the foreground where the fountain and planting areas are located (the darkest regions of the photograph).
  • Underexposure. The second photograph is underexposed. The underexposure brings out the details in the brightest areas of the scene that would otherwise be lost through a normal exposure.
  • Please see Image 2 to the right as an example of an underexposed image. The underexposure brings out the cloud detail in the bright sky.
  • Overexposure. The third photograph is overexposed. It brings out the details in the darkest areas of the scene.
  • Image 3 is an example of an overexposed image. It brings considerable detail and color to the foreground areas of the photograph.

The three photographs are merged into the HDR image, which contains a higher range of detail than would be available in any of the three photographs standing alone. Image 4 shows the HDR image.

HDR photos are particularly well suited for architectural photographs, real estate listings, historic building documentation, landscapes, or streetscapes.

Contact Us

Please contact us to schedule a consultation or to find out more information about our HDR photography.